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CHIPS Articles: Building the Navy’s Portion of the Cyber Mission Force

Building the Navy’s Portion of the Cyber Mission Force
By U.S. Fleet Cyber Command/U.S. 10th Fleet Public Affairs - October-December 2014
FORT GEORGE G. MEADE, Md. -- While October is National Cyber Security Awareness Month, a period for everyone to focus even more than usual on cybersecurity, it is also time to provide an update on the Navy’s contribution to the U.S. Cyber Command (USCYBERCOM) Cyber Mission Force (CMF).

The CMF is designed to accomplish three primary missions: the National Mission Force will, when directed, conduct operations to counter significant cyber threats to the nation; Combat Mission Force will support combatant commander priorities and missions; and Cyber Protection Force will defend Department of Defense information networks and improve network security.

The Navy continues to make strides in building its part of the CMF for USCYBERCOM by manning, training, and certifying its teams to USCYBERCOM standards.

As background, Navy is responsible for sourcing a total of 40 teams at this time, from a projected total of 133 across the services. The Navy teams are aligned as follows: seven National Teams, thirteen Combat Teams, and 20 Cyber Protection Teams.

The Navy teams are organized into existing U.S. Fleet Cyber Command subordinate commands at cryptologic centers; fleet concentration areas; and Fort Meade, Maryland, depending upon their specific mission.

USCYBERCOM also designated Fleet Cyber Command as the Joint Force Headquarters-Cyber (FCC JFHQ-C) to support U.S. Pacific Command and U.S. Southern Command in the development, oversight, planning and command and control of full spectrum cyberspace operations that are executed through attached Combat Mission and Support Teams.

This past August, as part the growth process, the Navy made a leap forward for the Sailors who are and will be part of the CMF teams.

U.S. Fleet Cyber Command’s senior enlisted leader for the FCC JFHQ-C received the Command Master Chief (CMC) badge during a ceremony at the Frank B. Rowlett Building Aug. 1, signifying an increase in vested authority and responsibility for the Navy CMF teams’ top enlisted position.

Master Chief Cryptologic Technician (Networks) Joel E. L. Brown, JFHQ-C senior enlisted leader, was pinned with the CMC badge by Vice Adm. Jan E. Tighe, commander, U.S. Fleet Cyber Command/U.S. 10th Fleet (FCC/C10F) and FCC/C10F Command Master Chief Jon Taylor.

“This is so critically important moving forward as we build our teams - specifically, our CMTs [combat mission teams] that the JFHQ-C will be directly responsible for - forging the future of what it means to deliver warfighting effects,” said Tighe.

CMTs for which FCC JFHQ-C has C2 will include Air Force and Army members. Similarly, Sailors will be members of CMTs led by the other services and dedicated to their respective focus areas.

“I am very humbled and honored to accept this and I will use it on behalf of the Soldiers, Sailors, and Airmen who will depend on me to be focused on issues affecting their operational readiness and to communicate those issues to senior leadership,” Brown said.

Navy will provide approximately 30 percent of the overall CMF.

The work to stand up the FCC JFHQ-C has been fast paced, but deliberate and intense.

In November 2013, the Cyber Flag 14-1 exercise marked the first time U.S. Fleet Cyber Command and the other components of the CMF construct executed mission as a cohesive force, which included exercising C2 through all the services’ incipient JFHQ-C elements.

The exercise integrated cyber professionals from across the Defense Department to test their knowledge and skills against a realistic adversary on a closed network.

In May 2014, the FCC JFHQ-C element completed Cyber Knight 14-1, which is an exercise that certifies teams and JFHQs are operating at a joint standard. The certification team included experts in command and control and cyber operations from across the Navy and Department of Defense.

In its role as Service Cyber Component to USCYBERCOM, U.S. Fleet Cyber Command maintains command and control (C2) of the FCC JFHQ-C.

U.S. Fleet Cyber Command serves as the Navy component command to U.S. Strategic Command and U.S. Cyber Command, and the Navy’s Service Cryptologic Component commander under the National Security Agency/Central Security Service.

U.S. Fleet Cyber Command also reports directly to the Chief of Naval Operations as an Echelon II command.

TENTH Fleet (C10F) is the operational arm of U.S. Fleet Cyber Command and executes its mission through a task force structure similar to other warfare commanders.

In this role, C10F provides operational direction through its Maritime Operations Center located at Fort George Meade Maryland, executing command and control over assigned forces in support of Navy or joint missions in cyber/networks, information operations, electronic warfare, cryptologic/signals intelligence and space.

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