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CHIPS Articles: Machine Learning, AI and IoT — the possibilities are endless

Machine Learning, AI and IoT — the possibilities are endless
By Sharon Anderson - January-March 2018
In this edition, we explore a few of the recent efforts by the Department of the Navy to attain advanced capabilities using the powerful fusion of machine-learning, artificial intelligence, data science, autonomy, and human-machine teaming to further drive naval warfare innovation and efficient business operations.

The DON has long been invested in applying these technologies to solve its top problems. The DON aims to make the naval services more lethal on the battlefield and reduce the risk to personnel and high value assets by taking the man out of the loop. The objective is to create AI systems that can free warfighters from dirty, dangerous and tedious activities, like mine disposal and cargo delivery, so they can focus on solving more complex warfighting challenges.

Rear Adm. Danelle Barrett, the Navy Cyber Security Division Director on the staff of the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Information Warfare (OPNAV N2N6), and the Digital Warfare Office staff discuss the Navy’s vision for utilizing the Navy’s data for warfighting advantage.

Admiral Barrett observed that to truly achieve what some experts are calling “algorithmic warfare,” the Navy must move rapidly to data standardization and cloud computing. “To move these capabilities to the tactical edge we need to fundamentally change how we create and deliver content. We are at the point where we need revolution not evolution in those operational and technical architectures. This includes increased standardization, and becoming more agile so we can field capability quickly and better secure and efficiently transport data,” she said.

We are a data-driven nation.

On the homefront, for many years industry has produced a succession of high tech household appliances and devices designed to take the drudgery out of routine housekeeping tasks.

From robotic cleaning devices to smart appliances, to HVAC controls and security systems, the plethora of household innovations, coupled with the internet of things (IoT) technology, has fostered a new generation of products aimed at enriching our daily lives, conserving energy, keeping us safe and reducing the number of mundane tasks we perform each day.

From high tech manufacturing to online retailers, the application of these technologies has created highly efficient systems and increasing productivity. Health care providers leverage the convergence of these technologies to improve patient care, diagnose illnesses more quickly, and predict and prevent pandemics.

On an international scale, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, in conjunction with multiple organizations and government agencies, is working to build “Smart and Secure Cities and Communities.” The idea is to make communities more resilient in the face of national disasters and other emergency situations. In a February event, Smart and Secure Cities and Communities Challenge Kickoff 2018, hundreds of tech innovators and municipal governments from around the world will seek to harness the power of networked IoT to address common problems — from easing traffic congestion and mitigating electrical blackouts to coordinating emergency response — solutions which can then be effectively replicated across multiple communities, according to NIST.

The possibilities for using these technologies for the common good, public safety and national defense appear limitless and can help ensure America’s national security and economic prosperity — as well as improving the quality of life for individuals.

Welcome new e-subscribers!
Sharon Anderson

Sharon Anderson is the CHIPS senior editor. She can be reached at chips@navy.mil

The CHIPS January-March 2018 edition cover features: U.S. 5TH FLEET AREA OF OPERATIONS (May 27, 2017) Operations Specialist 2nd Class Olivia Donnelly coordinates the exchange of data between ships in the combat information center aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66). Hue City is part of the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group deployed in the U.S 5th Fleet area of operations in support of maritime security operations designed to reassure allies and partners, preserve the freedom of navigation and the free flow of commerce in the region.  U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Joshua M. Tolbert/Released.
The CHIPS January-March 2018 edition cover features: U.S. 5TH FLEET AREA OF OPERATIONS (May 27, 2017) Operations Specialist 2nd Class Olivia Donnelly coordinates the exchange of data between ships in the combat information center aboard the guided-missile cruiser USS Hue City (CG 66). Hue City is part of the George H.W. Bush Carrier Strike Group deployed in the U.S 5th Fleet area of operations in support of maritime security operations designed to reassure allies and partners, preserve the freedom of navigation and the free flow of commerce in the region. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Joshua M. Tolbert/Released.

Marine Corps Air Station Yuma - The Marine Corps’ first two Kaman K-MAX Helicopters arrived at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Ariz., Saturday, May 7, 2016. The K-MAX will be added to MCAS Yuma's already vast collection of military air assets, and will utilize the station’s ranges to strengthen training, testing and operations across the Marine Corps.    The K-MAX is the Marine's first unmanned helicopter designed for resupplying troops in remote locations. Aviation history was made when Marine Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Squadron 1 operated a K-MAX during its historic 90-minute flight, Dec. 17, 2012. Today, the KMAX remains deployed in Afghanistan flying missions operated by Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Squadron 2.
Marine Corps Air Station Yuma - The Marine Corps’ first two Kaman K-MAX Helicopters arrived at Marine Corps Air Station Yuma, Ariz., Saturday, May 7, 2016. The K-MAX will be added to MCAS Yuma's already vast collection of military air assets, and will utilize the station’s ranges to strengthen training, testing and operations across the Marine Corps. The K-MAX is the Marine's first unmanned helicopter designed for resupplying troops in remote locations. Aviation history was made when Marine Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Squadron 1 operated a K-MAX during its historic 90-minute flight, Dec. 17, 2012. Today, the KMAX remains deployed in Afghanistan flying missions operated by Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Squadron 2.

ATLANTIC OCEAN (Dec. 1, 2017) Sailors assigned to Unmanned Undersea Vehicle Squadron 1 (UUVRON 1), operating with Undersea Rescue Command (URC), recover an unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) from a small boat onto the Norwegian construction support vessel Skandi Patagonia, with the assistance of crew members and Argentine Navy partners. Undersea Rescue Command, the U.S. Navy's only submarine rescue unit, mobilized to support the Argentine government's search and rescue efforts for the Argentine Navy diesel-electric submarine A.R.A. San Juan (S 42).  U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Derek Harkins/Released
ATLANTIC OCEAN (Dec. 1, 2017) Sailors assigned to Unmanned Undersea Vehicle Squadron 1 (UUVRON 1), operating with Undersea Rescue Command (URC), recover an unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) from a small boat onto the Norwegian construction support vessel Skandi Patagonia, with the assistance of crew members and Argentine Navy partners. Undersea Rescue Command, the U.S. Navy's only submarine rescue unit, mobilized to support the Argentine government's search and rescue efforts for the Argentine Navy diesel-electric submarine A.R.A. San Juan (S 42). U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Derek Harkins/Released
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