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CHIPS Articles: IWTC San Diego Graduates Afloat Signals Analysis Training Course

IWTC San Diego Graduates Afloat Signals Analysis Training Course
By Lt. Patrick C. Rumsey, Information Warfare Training Command San Diego - April 6, 2020
SAN DIEGO – Information Warfare Training Command (IWTC) San Diego graduated 10 students, concluding another Afloat Signals Analysis Training (ASAT) course, April 3.

ASAT provides foundational education in signal recognition and analysis, and is tailored to operations in the U.S. 5th, 6th and 7th Fleets’ areas of responsibility.

“This course allows leadership to learn some of the more technical work their Sailors are doing in the Ship’s Signals Exploitation Space, or SSES," offered Chief Cryptologic Technician (Collection) Michael Huguley. "I can take information back to the ship to help us operate during deployments. Getting into the weeds with the analysis portion of the course was very useful and probably my favorite part."

Chief Cryptologic Technician (Collection) Matthew Jefferson seconded Huguley’s sentiments and added, “We are given signal information as part of our collection plans, but this course fills in knowledge gaps and provides more detailed information.”

ASAT was designed to provide cryptologic technician collection (CTR) personnel with knowledge and practical application in signals analysis operations using signals analysis tools installed in tactical cryptologic systems and cryptologic carry-on program equipment. Students learn to develop signal descriptor files, optimize signal collection equipment, identify recording techniques, identify modulation and transmission methods, recognize signals of interest (SOIs), classify SOIs, perform traffic analysis, identify SOIs to contacts of interest and fuse intelligence to perform time sensitive reporting.

Sailors augment classroom education with on-the-job training throughout their careers, but there are times when the resources a schoolhouse can provide are essential to nurturing vital skillsets.

“ASAT allowed me to better my understanding of signal analysis and to get hands on training that I would not normally be able to get on my ship,” shared Cryptologic Technician (Collection) 1st Class Nicholas Halpin.

Utility provided by the course is not exclusive to more senior Sailors like Huguley, Jefferson, and Halpin. Cryptologic Technician (Collection) 3rd Class Cody Neal remarked, “Taking this course, I was taught more about applications and software that we use as cryptologists than I had been exposed to in entry level training”. Cryptologic Technician (Collection) 3rd Class Augustine Wilson added, “I enjoyed this course for the hands-on training that we accomplished using our job sheets.”

IWTC San Diego, as part of the Center for Information Warfare Training (CIWT), provides a continuum of training to Navy and joint service personnel that prepares them to conduct information warfare across the full spectrum of military operations.

With four schoolhouse commands, two detachments, and training sites throughout the United States and Japan, CIWT trains over 20,000 students every year, delivering trained information warfare professionals to the Navy and joint services. CIWT also offers more than 200 courses for cryptologic technicians, intelligence specialists, information systems technicians, electronics technicians, and officers in the information warfare community.

For news from the Center for Information Warfare Training domain, visit www.navy.mil/local/cid/, www.netc.navy.mil/centers/ciwt/, www.facebook.com/NavyCIWT, or www.twitter.com/NavyCIWT.

Logo for Information Warfare Training Command San Diego. (U.S. Navy graphic by Michele Diamond)
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