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CHIPS Articles: Sharing Electromagnetic Spectrum

Sharing Electromagnetic Spectrum
By Sharon Anderson - April-June 2016
In this edition, we explore the electromagnetic spectrum and its effect on information warfare and U.S. military operations. The Department of the Navy Chief Information Officer took the lead in presenting articles that reveal the many aspects of allocating and using radio frequency spectrum for Navy and Marine Corps missions.

The cover art for the April-June edition illustrates just how technology has created an urgency for spectrum dominance and electronic maneuver in military operations — from unmanned systems, satellites, weapons, networks and communications — the demand for spectrum continues to grow.

At the same time, we are a cyber-centric society, from shopping, gaming, to banking, planning trips and keeping in touch with family and friends, we depend on spectrum for so many activities that are an intrinsic part of our daily routine.

Now that the Internet of Things is creating a network of embedded sensors in everything from home appliances to security systems to driverless cars, consumer appetite for spectrum has become increasingly voracious. Gartner research estimates the IoT network of devices will grow to 21 billion by 2020.

Radio frequency spectrum is a valuable commodity that drives government, military, financial, educational, consumer, and industry enterprises that heavily rely on broadband connectivity. The electromagnetic spectrum is a prized and finite resource that we must share nationally, as well as internationally.

RF spectrum is the economic engine of our nation and a national security priority. The Department of the Navy is investigating innovative ways to use, share and manage the electromagnetic spectrum. You can share your ideas by going to the DON CIO website at www.doncio.navy.mil or join DON Innovation on https://www.facebook.com/DUSNMSI or @DON_Innovation or visit the DON Innovation website at http://www.secnav.navy.mil/innovation/Pages/Home.aspx.

Welcome new e-subscribers!
Sharon Anderson

Sharon Anderson is the CHIPS senior editor. She can be reached at chips@navy.mil.

At left RM1C William G. Turpin reads radio-teletype tape just received at Naval Radio Station, Cheltenham, Maryland, from the Commander Operational Development Force, ready for automatic retransmission to Radio Washington. At right, RM3C D.F. Wellner handles manual ship-shore radio circuit. U.S. Navy photo.
At left RM1C William G. Turpin reads radio-teletype tape just received at Naval Radio Station, Cheltenham, Maryland, from the Commander Operational Development Force, ready for automatic retransmission to Radio Washington. At right, RM3C D.F. Wellner handles manual ship-shore radio circuit. U.S. Navy photo.

 Lt. William J. Mitchell, Crossroads Radio Program Officer, and ETM2c Henry N. Brown, broadcast engineer, setting up a short-wave radio broadcast at Bikini. In the background is double-plated glass looking into the broadcast booth aboard USS Appalachian, 1946. U.S. Navy photo.
Lt. William J. Mitchell, Crossroads Radio Program Officer, and ETM2c Henry N. Brown, broadcast engineer, setting up a short-wave radio broadcast at Bikini. In the background is double-plated glass looking into the broadcast booth aboard USS Appalachian, 1946. U.S. Navy photo.

Spc. Adrian Quidachay, Signal Company, Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion, 25th Infantry Division, conducts data and chat communications with a Mobile User Objective System Manpack radio; Feb. 18 , 2016, on Schofield Barracks, Hawaii during a U.S. Army Pacific exercise which highlighted joint communications in the Pacific Theater. The MUOS is a military communications satellite that supports worldwide, multi-service users. Using the Army's Manpack radios and friendly-force tracker Joint Battle Command-Platform (JBC-P), with the Navy's MUOS waveform, Soldiers in five geographically disperse locations — on land and at sea — were able to talk, text, share data and track the progress of the Army Logistics Supply Vessel during the exercise. Photo by Staff Sgt. Tramel Garrett, 25th ID Public Affairs
Spc. Adrian Quidachay, Signal Company, Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion, 25th Infantry Division, conducts data and chat communications with a Mobile User Objective System Manpack radio; Feb. 18 , 2016, on Schofield Barracks, Hawaii during a U.S. Army Pacific exercise which highlighted joint communications in the Pacific Theater. The MUOS is a military communications satellite that supports worldwide, multi-service users. Using the Army's Manpack radios and friendly-force tracker Joint Battle Command-Platform (JBC-P), with the Navy's MUOS waveform, Soldiers in five geographically disperse locations — on land and at sea — were able to talk, text, share data and track the progress of the Army Logistics Supply Vessel during the exercise. Photo by Staff Sgt. Tramel Garrett, 25th ID Public Affairs
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