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CHIPS Articles: Editor's Notebook, October-December 2002

Editor's Notebook, October-December 2002
By Sharon Anderson - October-December 2002
Remember, Renew, Rebuild. These words are taken from an exhibit in New York City, showcasing six proposals for the World Trade Center site—they are also descriptive of how Americans have responded to the tragedies of September 11. During Sept. 11 ceremonies, Deputy Defense Secretary Paul D. Wolfowitz praised the construction workers of the Phoenix Project, who made the Pentagon whole again one year after Flight 77 slammed into the building's western wall.

As we remember our fallen colleagues and fellow Americans, and their families, we are stronger as a nation than we have ever been. Key to our strength is our confidence in the U.S. military, who have responded superbly in defense of freedom.

A cornerstone of national defense is the state-of-the-art technology used by the Services—ashore, afloat, in the air and on the battlefield. An integral part of the transformation of the Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of the Navy (DON) entails equipping service members with effective information, sensors and weapons in an asymmetric threat environment—and most importantly, linking the Services' command and control communications to form a net-centric warfare capability.

Our national leaders are relying on IT and IT professionals to meld the web of Homeland Defense strategies for infrastructure protection of waterways, public utilities, public transportation, financial institutions, medical facilities, etc. IT professionals have a major role to play in enabling the type of protection and advantage we need at home and on the battlefield.

Americans have an inherent faith in "American ingenuity." American ingenuity has been the driving force in everything from our military victories and status as the only remaining superpower, to our high standard of living and longevity. Historically, American ingenuity has been the chief ingredient in our technological advancements—envied by our enemies and cherished by our citizens.

As we go about the business of enabling a network-centric military force and homeland protection plan, we will be including a good measure of American ingenuity, the foundation on which our nation was built.

Hearty thanks to the U.S. Air Force for the warm welcome CHIPS received in Montgomery, Ala., at the Air Force Information Technology Conference 2002, August 25 – 29, 2002. Welcome to our new Air Force subscribers!

TAGS: ITAM, Workforce
The flag of the United States was draped over the side of the west wall during the Sept. 11 Memorial Service at the Pentagon.  More than 13,000 people attended the service to remember those who lost their lives one year ago when terrorists crashed a commercial airliner into the Department of Defense Headquarters.  DoD Photo/Tech. Sgt. Gary R. Coppage.
The flag of the United States was draped over the side of the west wall during the Sept. 11 Memorial Service at the Pentagon. More than 13,000 people attended the service to remember those who lost their lives one year ago when terrorists crashed a commercial airliner into the Department of Defense Headquarters. DoD Photo/Tech. Sgt. Gary R. Coppage.
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