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CHIPS Articles: Editor's Notebook, January-March 2010

Editor's Notebook, January-March 2010
By Sharon Anderson - January-March 2010
In this issue, we look at the many facets of managing the electromagnetic spectrum, more commonly known as the radio frequency band, with articles from the DON CIO, NAVSEA and the Multi-National Force-Iraq.

The array of spectrum topics demonstrates the complexities and wide scope of spectrum needs, from personal devices, to Defense Department systems and communications, to the radio frequencies allocated across the international community.

The use of the electromagnetic spectrum is something that we take for granted. I don't know about you, but take away my cell phone, garage door opener, satellite radio, or other entertainment and convenience devices, and I'm pretty grumpy. A more serious concern is how critical the use of the electromagnetic spectrum is to the defense, security and economic well-being of the United States.

Use of the electromagnetic spectrum has implications in our other feature articles as well, including the CNO-directed reorganization of the N2 and N6 directorates into the newly stood up Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Information Dominance (N2/N6); the DON's strategy for transition from the Navy Marine Corps Intranet to the Next Generation Enterprise Network; and the president's directive for a surge of 30,000 troops to Afghanistan to increase security and combat the insurgency.

This extraordinary logistics campaign is discussed by Air Force Brig. Gen. Robert Yates, USJFCOM's director for Operations, Plans, Logistics and Engineering (J3/4). USJFCOM, in its primary force provider role, is helping combatant and operational commanders plan and synchronize the deployment of forces to carry out the president’s strategy.

Try to imagine the spectrum resources that will be required for the communications and operational needs of 30,000 additional troops in Afghanistan. It's a sobering thought for the new year.

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Marines and Sailors with 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment disembark a C-17 cargo plane at Camp Bastion, Dec. 15, 2009, in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. For many of the junior Marines and Sailors of 1/6, this is their first deployment, and in many cases, their first time outside of the United States. For others, the deployment marks a return to Afghanistan after serving there in 2008. The Marines and Sailors grabbed their gear and loaded into white buses turned brown from dust and set out to Camp Leatherneck where they filed into ballroom-size tents and picked out places to bed down in their new home. Later, the Marines get on phones to hear the voices of friends, wives and children. Card and board games are played between training and work, as the Marines and Sailors seek out a routine that can be maintained throughout the course of their deployment.
Marines and Sailors with 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment disembark a C-17 cargo plane at Camp Bastion, Dec. 15, 2009, in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. For many of the junior Marines and Sailors of 1/6, this is their first deployment, and in many cases, their first time outside of the United States. For others, the deployment marks a return to Afghanistan after serving there in 2008.

The Marines and Sailors grabbed their gear and loaded into white buses turned brown from dust and set out to Camp Leatherneck where they filed into ballroom-size tents and picked out places to bed down in their new home.

Later, the Marines get on phones to hear the voices of friends, wives and children. Card and board games are played between training and work, as the Marines and Sailors seek out a routine that can be maintained throughout the course of their deployment.

Photo and story courtesy of American Forces Press Service.


ATTACK COURSE – A U.S. Marine fire team advances toward an enemy position after receiving simulated enemy contact during a training exercise on Camp Dwyer, Afghanistan, Jan. 2, 2010. The Marines ran an attack course focused on the positive identification of targets and precision fires to reduce the risk of civilian casualties during future operations. The fire team is assigned to Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment. U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. James W. Clark.
ATTACK COURSE – A U.S. Marine fire team advances toward an enemy position after receiving simulated enemy contact during a training exercise on Camp Dwyer, Afghanistan, Jan. 2, 2010. The Marines ran an attack course focused on the positive identification of targets and precision fires to reduce the risk of civilian casualties during future operations. The fire team is assigned to Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment. U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. James W. Clark.
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