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CHIPS Articles: Five CIWT Domain Sailors Recognized by NETC for Training Excellence

Five CIWT Domain Sailors Recognized by NETC for Training Excellence
By Glenn Sircy, Center for Information Warfare Public Affairs - December 15, 2017
PENSACOLA, Fla. (NNS) -- Five Sailors from the Center for Information Warfare Training (CIWT) domain were among those recognized by Naval Education and Training Command (NETC) during the 2017 Sailor and Military Instructors of the Year ceremony at the National Naval Aviation Museum onboard Naval Air Station Pensacola, Dec. 14.

The NETC Sailor of the Year (SOY) and Military Instructors of the Year (MIOY) programs recognize Sailors throughout the NETC domain who exhibit sustained superior performance, leadership, mentorship, knowledge and teaching of military history and heritage, self-improvement, command and community involvement and exemplary military bearing among other attributes.

The 2017 NETC MIOY winners from the CIWT domain are:

* Midgrade - Cryptologic Technician (Collection) 1st Class Francisco Peavy from Information Warfare Training Command (IWTC) Corry Station, Pensacola, Florida.
* Junior - Intelligence Specialist 2nd Class Nijah Lee from IWTC Virginia Beach, Virginia.

The 2017 NETC MIOY runner-up finalists from the CIWT domain are:

* Senior - Chief Cryptologic Technician (Maintenance) Bryan Shoberg from IWTC Corry Station, Pensacola, Florida
* Officer - Lt. Shannon Vestal from IWTC Virginia Beach, Virginia.

The 2017 NETC Sailor of the Year (SOY) finalist from the CIWT domain is:

* Cryptologic Technician (Collection) 1st Class Ashlee Havens from IWTC Corry Station, Pensacola, Florida.

"These Sailors' significant contributions to deliver trained information warfare professionals to the Navy and joint services, enabling optimal performance of information warfare across the full spectrum of military operations, are at the core of our mission," said Capt. Bill Lintz, CIWT commanding officer. "Their personal excellence in the development and training of the next generation of information warfare professionals epitomizes the dedication and professionalism of all personnel throughout the CIWT domain."

The CIWT domain is very proud to have nominees representing each of the five categories of the NETC competition and two overall winners as MIOY. These professionals were selected from an extremely talented field NETC nominees who exemplify the perseverance and expertise of instructors throughout the Navy. Concurrently, they are also indicative of the high-caliber enlisted personnel and officers who are instructing the Navy's Sailors throughout the CIWT domain on any given day.

"Our CIWT domain Sailor and Military Instructors of the Year clearly demonstrate exemplary performance and leadership, and through this recognition have proved to be the best of the best." said CIWT's Command Master Chief Mike Bates. "I'm extremely proud of their accomplishments and more importantly how the impact of their hard work ensures fleet mission readiness around the globe each and every day."

Peavy, a 2004 graduate of Bayside High School in Virginia Beach, Virginia, has served nearly 12 years in the Navy and is a qualified master training specialist.

"It was one thing to be nominated for Instructor of the Year of my command, but very humbling to be selected as the 2017 NETC Mid-grade Instructor of the Year," said Peavy. "It goes without saying, my recognition would not be possible without the support from my leadership, my team, and my students. I am the most grateful and excited Navy instructor today!"

As a Navy Instructor, Peavy understands the importance of his responsibility to successfully teach his students the operation of the equipment they will routinely use in the fleet, for at least, the first three years of their naval careers.

"This responsibility holds a lot of weight, so it is very satisfying when students nod their heads in affirmation after learning a complex topic," added Peavy.

Lee, a 2008 graduate of Sparta High School in Sparta, New Jersey, has served eight years in the Navy and is a qualified master training specialist.

"Every day is a chance to change another person's opinion about education," said Lee. "By displaying patience and professionalism, I am able to provide a comfortable learning environment where questions are strongly encouraged and knowledge is always the end result."

Lee challenges her students to be the best version of themselves, and motivates them to push past their expectations. Something she has learned while serving in the Navy is to never base one's success off other people, and always strive to learn something new every day.

"Working at a training command is extremely challenging, but rewarding, for anyone that wants to grow professionally and share their knowledge in their field of expertise," added Lee.

Shoberg, a 2004 graduate of Tallwood High School in Virginia Beach, Virginia, has served 13 years in the Navy and is a qualified master training specialist.

"While teaching 'A' school, I am the first military person new Sailors see outside of boot camp, so it is very important to set the right standard before sending future cryptologic technicians to the fleet," said Shoberg.

Shoberg shared instructor duty is a challenging duty assignment, but if you are motivated and would like to impact the future Sailors of the Navy and your rate, then instructor duty is the way to go.

"My technical expertise has definitely grown teaching at both 'A' and 'C' schools, added Shoberg. "The leadership experience gained while working at a training command has helped me grow both personally and professionally."

Vestal, a 1996 graduate of Starmount High School in Boonville, North Carolina, has served in the Navy for 16 years and is a qualified master training specialist.

"You are able to shape and guide new naval officers in a critical time period of their career, setting the tone for a rewarding career in the intelligence profession, no matter the length of time they serve," said Vestal.

Vestal inspires his students by displaying her passion for the job, the intelligence community and the Navy. She always sets the tone with high energy and challenges each class to be their absolute best, helping build their confidence as intelligence professionals.

"Our Navy is filled with inspirational, hard-working young men and women, and they choose to fill the need, serving their nation as warfighters, added Vestal. "Without these people, the world's greatest Navy does not operate, and I am humbled each day for the opportunity to lead these fine people in support of our nation's mission."

Havens, a 2006 graduate of Lanier County High School in Lakeland, Georgia, has served in the Navy for 11 years and is a master training specialist.

"We have the opportunity to mold Sailors and give them the drive to be the best they possibly can be, before hitting the fleet," said Havens. "Our sole purpose is not just to instruct these Sailors in a rating, we are here to inspire them beyond our influence so that their passion for learning continues on to their next command."

Havens understands the only limitations she has are those she may impose upon herself. Her ability to grow has been fostered by her willingness to learn from those around her; whether that learning comes from her peers, leaders or subordinates.

"By working with those around me and accepting the guidance of my mentors, I know that I have become a better leader than I could have ever expected three years ago," added Havens. "My goal is to continue to share this knowledge with those around me in the hopes of expanding this culture of leadership that has such an influence on me."

For more information, visit http://www.navy.mil/, http://www.facebook.com/usnavy/, or http://www.twitter.com/usnavy/.

For news from the Center for Information Warfare Training enterprise, visit www.navy.mil/local/cid/, www.netc.navy.mil/centers/ciwt/, www.facebook.com/NavyCIWT, or www.twitter.com/NavyCIWT.

PENSACOLA, Fla. (Dec. 14, 2017) Rear Adm. Kyle Cozad, commander, Naval Education and Training Command (NETC), presents the 2017 Mid-Grade Military Instructor of the Year Award to Cryptologic Technician (Collection) 1st Class Francisco Peavy from Information Warfare Training Command Corry Station. Peavy received his award during a ceremony recognizing both the Military Instructors of the Year and the NETC Sailor of the Year.  U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Taylor L. Jackson/Released
PENSACOLA, Fla. (Dec. 14, 2017) Rear Adm. Kyle Cozad, commander, Naval Education and Training Command (NETC), presents the 2017 Mid-Grade Military Instructor of the Year Award to Cryptologic Technician (Collection) 1st Class Francisco Peavy from Information Warfare Training Command Corry Station. Peavy received his award during a ceremony recognizing both the Military Instructors of the Year and the NETC Sailor of the Year. U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Taylor L. Jackson/Released

PENSACOLA, Fla. (Dec. 14, 2017) Rear Adm. Kyle Cozad, commander, Naval Education and Training Command (NETC), presents the 2017 Junior Military Instructor of the Year Award to Intelligence Specialist 2nd Class Nijah Lee from Information Warfare Training Command Virginia Beach. Lee received her award during a ceremony recognizing both the Military Instructors of the Year and the NETC Sailor of the Year.  U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Taylor L. Jackson/Released
PENSACOLA, Fla. (Dec. 14, 2017) Rear Adm. Kyle Cozad, commander, Naval Education and Training Command (NETC), presents the 2017 Junior Military Instructor of the Year Award to Intelligence Specialist 2nd Class Nijah Lee from Information Warfare Training Command Virginia Beach. Lee received her award during a ceremony recognizing both the Military Instructors of the Year and the NETC Sailor of the Year. U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Taylor L. Jackson/Released

PENSACOLA, Fla. (Dec. 14, 2017) Sailors from the Center for Information Warfare Training pose for a photo after being recognized during the Naval Education and Training Command Military Instructor of the Year and Sailor of the Year award ceremony. From left to right: Lt. Shannon Vestal, Officer Instructor of the Year finalist; Cryptologic Technician (Collection) 1st Class Ashlee Havens, Sailor of the Year finalist; Cryptologic Technician (Collection) 1st Class Francisco Peavy, Mid-Grade Instructor of the Year winner; Intelligence Specialist 2nd Class Nijah Lee, Junior Instructor of the Year winner; and Chief Cryptologic Technician (Maintenance) Bryan Shoberg, Senior Instructor of the Year finalist.  U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Taylor L. Jackson/Released
PENSACOLA, Fla. (Dec. 14, 2017) Sailors from the Center for Information Warfare Training pose for a photo after being recognized during the Naval Education and Training Command Military Instructor of the Year and Sailor of the Year award ceremony. From left to right: Lt. Shannon Vestal, Officer Instructor of the Year finalist; Cryptologic Technician (Collection) 1st Class Ashlee Havens, Sailor of the Year finalist; Cryptologic Technician (Collection) 1st Class Francisco Peavy, Mid-Grade Instructor of the Year winner; Intelligence Specialist 2nd Class Nijah Lee, Junior Instructor of the Year winner; and Chief Cryptologic Technician (Maintenance) Bryan Shoberg, Senior Instructor of the Year finalist. U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Taylor L. Jackson/Released
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